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will outspend us in this election but we can't allow them to outwork us. we will re-elect president obama. are you ready? [ applause ] we must engage in the political system but that isn't enough. to help students succeed in these challenging times, we must also harness the strength of our association to take charge of the teaching profession. we need to support our members to define what good teaching looks like so others can't reduce good teaching to standardized tests. we must have a real say, a real say, in how educators are prepared, trained and evaluated. we are all leaders in our union and in our profession. we know how to bargain for a contract, how to mobilize our members for an election, how to advocate for legislation and obviously we need to keep doing all of those things with the attacks that are coming, we must do it and do it well. but my question to you is this. are we willing to assert our leadership and take responsibility for our professions? the demands of our work are changing as our students change and as the world around us is changing too fast, it is time for us to
things happening. let us do our thing. those areas of technology or entrepreneurs are allowed to go forth, whether to sell funds or cash machines, are going to work great are on the world. that is all the innovation and opportunity we need -- such as all the opportunity we need. provide in the outlook -- innovation for us. >> do policy makers like to come down here? >> they do like to come down. we think is very important that they see what the real world is like, so they can make votes and do other things that are affecting how we build products and what you can do and things like that. great innovators like apple and google and others, we hired them here in the united states, and we have great international companies here. but the u.s. is the world leader and we want to keep it that way. it is important that we have the right policies. >> we walked into the displays and saw that you had your legislative agenda essentially on that table, including about, so but, and others. -- hipaa, sopa and others. what has this been like for you? >> it has been great for us. we killed hipaa and sopa.
voice of america. steve redisch will join us. >> told phil talked of a leak types in different cities. berchtold he talked to a hold a wide range of people. explore the countryside here he wanted to and understand what makes american stick. he had read that americans were individualistic. he actually saw us as much more collectivist this. it seems hard for us to imagine. he saw the u.s. as a group of people who like to form associations. who wanted to always be with other people. after he went to the u.s., he saw the french as the individualists. from that, he concluded that he was going to put up his colossal statute. he was going to have to say something to people who understood themselves as a big group. as a society. as a collective entity. >> watch this whole event as part of our lineup. it includes a discussion on how social media has changed the news coverage. commencement speeches from new york mayor, cory booker, and he long must -- elon musk. that starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we had pulled into the spot that morning. >> the former commanding officer of th
minutes. >> thank you, orval, and senator for joining us today for our conversation about ian bremmer's wonderful new book. this book is about the g-0 world. he is a fabulous political scientist who really speaks to the big major changes underway in the world today, getting beyond the ivory tower. he has been making some money, which come as a fellow political scientist, i think this is a great tribute, but it also shows how politics and government are really driving so much of the global economy, so that the economists knowledge is really not sufficient, even for investors, as well as ordinary citizens to understand where we are going. this book is very interesting, we have this new concept of the g-0 world. it is really about the problem of global cooperation. it is not so much a book about the competition among nations. it is about the kind of leadership in the world today. i wanted to start off they may be telling us you really think that the united states has been an effective leader up until now, and that it is really -- it is really a loss of american leadership that this book
. >> an to calcutta, india. sex workers are barred from entering u.s. and holding alternative conference. we will take a look at the aids epidemic in black america and speak with congress member barbara lee of california. >> we need to make some noise. we need to put eradicating hiv and aids at the front burner of our political agenda, both here and abroad. >> all that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. syrian troops continue to bombard the city of aleppo in a bid to reclaim areas held by rebel forces. there have been reports of syrian helicopters backed by fighter jets firing from above, forcing hundreds of residents to flee. and allepo resident said syrian forces had fired indiscriminately, killing civilians. >> two brothers and their uncles were killed, another is between life and death. tend shells on a daily basis and this village has not had any sign of armed groups. we are targeted only because we call for freedom. >> speaking in washington, secretary state clinton said of killing of syrian president bashar al-assad is inev
should be dedicated and i don't know how any of us can say with the proper number of children to be medicated would be. how many hundreds of thousands would be the right number. i just hope that in so far as kids are getting this care that it's done in a sensitive way, and in a way that is as productive and helpful for their long-term development as possible. >> guest: there is a serious problem of abuse of occasions of stimulants that gets a lot of media attention, doesn't necessarily help in terms of understanding why kids are being prescribed medication. it does however point to the pressures that are bearing down on these kids they feel like we have to be sort of superhuman. to what extent do you think we can in white society for kids mental health problems? should we be indicting society? should we have a biological view and see these kids will be having problems no matter what? where do you come down thinking about that? .. >> yes. that is his takeover if the child is impaired not functioning as they should be to let them go on that way. >> it is fascinating. the book sh
ten years when the u.s. first after september 11th invaded afghanistan. i don't know, some of you are too young to remember, but others of us might remember looking at our tv screens and seeing the pictures of these very fancy, new weapons that we had. this idea that we know had these precision weapons that would only target the people that we wanted to get and would not result in collateral damage. and it was almost a way to say to people, calmed down, don't be worried. we will be killing innocent people. so, i was worried because i don't have as sense that the latest and greatest new weapon is going to protect innocent people and went to afghanistan three weeks after the invasion with several other colleagues. it was before we even got into afghanistan on the border of pakistan that we found already people who would be considered collateral damage. the first young woman i met is somebody who sticks with me because she looked like my daughter. she was 13 years old. my daughter at that time was 13 years old. i felt an affinity with her and asked her if i could learn about her stor
capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and others. the systems have become a force multiplier for military operations and for border security. however, we run the edge of the new horizon. using unmanned aerial systems within the homeland currently are 200 active certificates of operation issue i the federal aviation administration to over 100 different entities such as law enforcement department and academic institutions to fly drugs domestically. this map on the monitor shows the locations of coa recipients as at april 2012. the number of recipients since that time has in fact increased. the faa plans to select 65 cities around the country for the use of nongovernment euros this year and plans to
executive arnie gundersen about the report and what it means for u.s. plants. then a look at serious operations in africa and how the united states rendered, tortured and discarded one innocent man from tanzania. and protests against the u.s. mining giant newmont are escalating in peru. five participants in those protests have been killed in the past week. a state of emergency has been declared. >> the government is mistaken if it thinks it is going to crash the justified cries of the people. >> we will speak with amy goodman in spain today, 75 years after the bombing of that city. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm juan gonzalez. i am filling in for amy goodman. the u.s. and european union are calling for new sanctions on syria similar to those used against the gaddafi regime ahead of the nato attack on libya. at an international friends of syria gathering in paris, secretary of state clinton invoked the threat of chapter 7 under the u.n. charter, which ranges from economic embargos to military force. the news co
is cooling, we look at what the slowdown means for u.s. corporate earnings, and the global economy. >> susie: and one company is making a big push into china, marriott international, a look at its latest earnings and strategy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" >> tom: markets were clearly disappointed today the federal reserve does not seem ready to act right away to boost the economy. minutes from the fed's june meeting show only a few policy makers wanted to expand a bond buying program known as quantitative easing to lower interest rates and boost the economy. but as darren gersh reports this is now really a question of timing. >> reporter: the fed was not willing to give markets an immediate monetary fix, but the latest readings from its policy making committee show a couple more lukewarm reports on the labor market might change that. >> and if these employment reports are still weak like this last one, i think a strong case could be made for the fed to expand its balance sheet and try to support the economy more. so, at that point it will be clear that the recovery has stalled
will not hesitate to use chemical weapons -- the assad regime will not hesitate to use chemical weapons if things get worse. we go to the coast of honduras, where cocaine has become the country's curse. and running for gold. how an olympian overcame the odds to compete for america. >> when i look at where i came from, i have to pinch myself. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. tonight, the fighting in syria appears to be moving closer to the center of the capital, damascus. over the past couple days, clashes between government forces and rebel fighters have taken place in the southern suburbs of the city. now, even more worrying, syria's for ambassador to iraq, who defected last week, said that forces loyal to president saleh saad will not hesitate to use chemical weapons. -- syria's former ambassador to iraq, who defected last week, said that forces loyal to president assad will not hesitate to use chemical weapons. >> international diplomacy is struggling to find a way out. in these pictures, activists say people are trying to flee heavy shelling in damascus.
the globe take action to boost their sagging economies. should more be done in the u.s.? >> susie: i'm susie gharib. getting new medicines to market faster. speeding up the government's drug approval process. why investors and patients are on board. >> tom: and "made in america" tonight, a craft beer company brewing up a national expansion. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the global economy was the hot topic in markets around the world today. central banks in europe, the u.k., and china announced moves to boost growth. the european central bank lowered interest rates to an all-time low. china cut several key interest rates for the second time in a month. and the bank of england held its rates steady, but said it will pump billions of dollars into its economy through a new round of bond buying. here in the u.s., some hopeful signs for the weak job market. private employers added 176,000 new workers to their payrolls in june, stronger than the previous month. and the labor department said the number of people filing for unemployment benefits dropped by 14,000 in the past
the u.s. electrical grids. >> this week on "the communicators" walt mossberg who writes a personal technology column in the "wall street journal" that is geared toward the average technology user. >> host: tech watchers and viewers of this program will recognize the name walt mossberg of the "wall street journal," maybe not the face, but he is joining us this week on "the communicators". he writes the personal technology column in the "wall street journal," and he is also co executive editor of all things the .com. when did you start writing your column? >> guest: it was 1992 -- 1991. you can call me walt. >> host: i appreciate that. do you remember what your first column was about in 1991? >> guest: the first line of my first column was personal computers are just too hard to use and is now your fault. the idea behind the column was there are a lot of computer columns of the time, technology columns. the contribution i made was to convince the editors of the journal that we should write a column on like nearly all the others that was not written by geeks for geeks but was actually
legislation could cost a lot more than friends of obama claim. joining us from washington is mr. peter doocy. >> when the votes were tally this had repeal measure passed the house 244 to 158 and no republican defected. mark ross from arkansas, jim mestison and larry kis el from north carolina all voted in favor of repeal. it was the 33rd vote this gop controlled congress is put together to either repeal or de fund the affordable care act. the whole process is becoming a big time waster. >>> casting these votes begun and again and again probably on average once every few weeks does nothing to improve the got tomorrow line does nothing to send a single 18-year-old person to college. does nothing to help build new industries in this country. it certainly does nothing to help provide healthcare to the american people. >>> but republicans see things differently. according to the speaker of the house the only reason their bills haven't gone anywhere is because the senate has stepped up. they have the opportunity to wido just that. >> for those who support repealing this harmful healthcare law we a
the farm bill and it already passed the u.s. senate and a scheduled vote wednesday on a repeal of the affordable care act known as obama care following the ruling last week by the supreme court. it is sunday, july 8 and will begin with our focus on u.s. foreign policy and hillary clinton who is in tokyo today for a series of talks on the u.s./nato role in afghanistan or the next decade. will get your calls and comments about u.s. foreign policy generally and the performance of the secretary of state, hillary clinton specifically. our phone lines are open -- you can join the conversation on our twitter page and facebook. or send us an e-mail. there are a couple of articles related to the secretary of state and this one is from cbs news. she beat the former record held by madeleine albright. there is this from "the l.a. times." she was asked about corruption in the country. she said it is a major challenge to meet the standards of accountability and transparency. the exchange came during this unannounced stopover by the secretary of state. even if her words or encouraging, many i
the vatican versus u.s. nuns. this really is about the future of how we interpret the message of the second vatican council. >>> and islamic art, in present and former arab lands. >>> major funding for "religion & ethics newsweekly" is provided by the lilly endowment, an indianapolis basededvate family foundation, dedicated to its founders and christian religion, community development and education. additional funding provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual and group retirement product. that's why we're your retirement company. the estate of william j. carter. the jane henson foundation and corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. thousands of political leaders, doctors and activists gathered in washington this week for the biannual international aids conference, held for the first time in the u.s. in more than 20 years. at a georgetown university summit timed to the conference, religious groups highlighted the role of faith-based efforts in combating the disease internationally. mega church pastor rick warre
stores. he's on the phone with us. good morning. >> good morning. >> help us break down the stet lment. who is the real winner here? is it the retailer? >> unfortunately, it's not. the only winners are visa, mastercard and their banks. they have gotten a hall pass if this deal goes through. it's not a done deal. it's a proposal now. they have a hall pass to continue to raise their swipe fees without restraint and not have anybody be able to enforce the law against them. they have to be feeling good now. >> the swipe fee reduction is only for eight months. what could happen after that. it could go back up? >> i tell you, with the credit card companies, you always have to read the fine print. what you read this is remarkable. they are not even going to reduce the swipe fees for the eight months. what they are going to do is take the dollar value of that and roll it into the settlement. because there's nothing to change the structure of how they do things today, by the time the merchants actually get any of that money, swipe fees will have gone up by more than the amount of that money. me
is asking us to support a situation where a 13 year old child can be sent to another nation without any regard for their welfare after that moment. and even if we have word from the immigration minister about this being a case by case basis, the enactment of this -- is the most damning thing for our conscience. that is why i feel entirely consistent, that is why i was so angry from before. i wrestle with my conscience on this debate but i am entirely consistent with my soul. i will sleep easy because i know from my own background and what i have done in the past that i will be consistent, no matter how painful it may be in the electorate, and how hard it could be to explain to my constituents. i rest easy on this because i am been consistent with what beats within my soul. >> the question is resolved in the affirmative. >> those are the highlights of the australian parliamentary sitting in june. we will see you next time. >> the british house of commons began summer recess until september 3. prime minister's questions returns september 5, at 7:00 eastern. the use of domestic drones' by
reportedly been used in areas to the city's south. committee of the red cross to join the united nations in describing the conflict in syria as a civil war. the red cross had previously kept its assessment to a handful of flashpoint areas, but now says the violence is nationwide. the observer mission meanwhile has confirmed heavy weaponry was used last week in the village of tremseh, where pro-assad forces were accused of massacring more than 100 civilians. u.n. spokesperson announced the observers' findings earlier today. >> our observers confirmed the use of direct and indirect weapons including artillery and mortar shells and small arms. counts of 27 eyewitnesses' we interviewed, the consistent accounts indicated the attacks were 5:00 in the morning by shelling and ground forces. >> the al-assad regime has denied carrying out a massacre in tremseh, claiming it killed anti-government rebels. the an arab league peace envoy kofi annan is headed to moscow for talks on a new security council response to the ongoing violence in syria. deputyng in lebanon, dietar secretary state william burn
weapons and would use the myth based with a foreign attack. the suspect in the mass shooting in a colorado movie theater makes his first appearance in court. one columbine survivor is faced with tragedy again. >> to live through it twice, it is on real. -- it is unreal. it is not fair. >> forget about the canoing you did at summer camp. bbc is getting in on the act. first up, a ride down the rapids. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. faced with a foreign attack, syria will be ready to unleash its chemical weapons. that was the warning from the assad regime that served as the first public acknowledgement country possesses such materials. it comes as fierce fighting continues in damascus. our correspondent reports from the border crossing between syria. >> there are huge numbers of heavily armed government forces in this northern city determined to stop the rebel army capturing the country's commercial center. outnumbered and out-gunned, the fsa occasionally scores remarkable successes. these pictures cannot be verified, but they're said to show heavy equipment ta
cupcakes. that's it for us. thanks for watching us. bill will be back on monday. but please, remember that the blueberry spin stops right here because we are always looking out for you. >> i am told we all should vote. that overpopulation is what makes poor people poor. >> higher education is the single most important investment. >> i'm, you should go to college. >> i am so upset. >> politicians say olympic clothing must be made in america. people think they know why people free-load. >> it would be a shame to waste those shrimp. >> but what you think you know, often is not so. >> my hand is not catching fire. >> myth and truth -- that's our show tonight. and now, john stossel. what you think you know may not be so. how can that be? we know a lot. we go to school, read, watch tv, learn from parent, friends. why would what we know not be so? because our instincts are often wrong. took me too long to learn that. when i was a consumer reporter, i thought government regulation was the solution to consumers being ripped off -- wrong. regulation hurt consumers more. i thought ame
. that's all for us tonight. >>> welcome, everyone. tonight, a keeping them honest special. an investigation into charity cheats. when you open your heart and your wallet to help a charity, how do you know your money will be put to good use? in the next hour, we're going to bring you drew griffin's investigation of the charities accused of collecting millions of dollars in donations and not spending it where donors expect it. one of the charities under scrutiny is called the disabled veterans national foundation. that's their logo, looks very official. dvnf. there is no sign that any of the cash donations, $56 million they have raised over three years, went directly to the men and women who sacrificed so much in war zones, not one dime. because of drew's reporting, the senate finance committee is demanding answers from the dvnf. more on that tonight. drew also uncovered yet another veterans charity called the national veterans foundation, which is taking donations, but using only a very small percentage to actually help vets. there are also charities that claim to help aban
>> good morning, everyone. thanks so much for getting up with us. hope you had a great day yesterday. a lot of tired people out there this morning. >> but you're watching us and that's good. i'm heather childers. thanks for watching "fox & friends first." >> the top five at 5:00. it is day six of darkness for at least one million people along the east coast. now, some of them aren't expected to get electricity back until sunday. now, to get a good perspective on the scope of these outages check out these before and after aerial images of washington, d.c. this was actually released by nasa. the photo significantly darker on the right following that deadly storm that killed 26 people. >> auto amazing pictures. an insider attack leaves five american soldiers injured outside a nato base in eastern afghanistan. a witness says afghan civilians were talking to the soldiers when a man in an afghan army uniform opened fire with a machine gun. >> iran delivering a disturbing threat to the united states as it holds a new round of war games. iran claiming that it can destroy nearby mi
we used to say faculty took 80% to. and 200 years ago it makes them in the effective. it is to start on the aspect of the college and university the way academic programs are delivered. you will say a much greater savings. . . for thi hearing. see no objection, mr. duncan, yet no objection to that? i now recognize myself for an opening statement. unmanned aerial systems commonly known as drone has been a game changer for men and women serving in iraq and afghanistan. the systems have provided troops with eyes in the skies have taken the flight to the enemy. to eliminate the most dangerous al qaeda terrorist, drums have increased capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and
'll be talking about youth and young adults in recovery. joining us in our panel today are tami bahr, assistant director, connections counseling, board member of recovery foundation, madison, wisconsin; jonathan katz, director, rita j. kaplan jewish community services, jewish board of family and children services, new york, new york; justin riley, at-large board member, faces and voices of recovery, seattle, washington; bridget ruiz, technical expert lead, division of systems improvement, jbs international, bethesda, maryland. bridget, 21.5 percent of 18- to 25-year-olds have an issue with illicit drugs. talk to me a little bit about that and what kind of drugs are they using. it is quite different than it was even 2 or 3 years ago. we see a huge increase in pharmaceutical drug use, not using it as prescribed. we also see an increase in alcohol use, and binge drinking is a serious problem, as well as some of the more legal types of drugs labeled as incense or those types of things in different smoke shops. and jonathan, does that hold true for what you are seeing in new york city? absolutely. w
european blue chips including novartis. >>> positive earnings outlooks from u.s. tech giants ibm, e-bay and qualcomm. >>> smartphone tablet marketers power the world's big jegest ch makers. >> media reports say credit deutsche bank and hsbc are being investigated over alleged libor actions. >>> okay. so another show is under way this morning. >> you already had quite a busy day. >> kind of fascinating to me that this new launch of an exchange in london, in new york you had nyse and london will have more direct competition. >> what they will do, they will get companies that are already listed in europe and get them to come. >> easier to do it that way. >> so they get another pool of investors. something big has already start this morning. >> what do you mean? >> the opening championship. >> with golf. okay. >> under way. tiger tees off in 40 minutes. >> we'll bring that to you live. >> the lower house of parliament is due to vote on the spanish bailout. >> chinese banks boost lending in july. they plan to subsidize overseas development. we will find out where the money is flowing. >>
's lawsuit against the u.s. anti doping agency. arm strog wants to stop the agency to stripping him of his 7 tour defrance titles. the judge dismissing the suit because of procedural issues. his lawyers will refile it today. the agency claims he took performance enhancing drugs for years which he denies. damage to the washington month monument during last summer's earthquake could keep the building closed for two years. the estimate from the national park service. we have video now that sent tourists running. the quakes caused large chunks of stones to loosen and crack especially near the top. the $15 million worth of repairs were expected to take just a year. 600 thousand tourists visit that monument every year. >>> the florida lifeguard who inspired -- he was awarded the key to the city from hole endale beach officials but getting a bigger award from a man who almost drowned from the man on the beach. >> you saved my life. >> you hear he was okay. we heard he is doing okay. i never had confirmation. i never knew how he was really doing. now seeing him here it's overwhelming. >> tomas was o
planes and wearing u.s.-designed footwear and this makes us all richer. >> it absolutely does. >> people don't get that. >> no, they don't. one could argue that the american uniforms were not manufactured in china, they were grown in a soy bean field in iowa. something we export to china is soy beans because we are incredibly productive in the soy bean market, we get more uniforms at lower prices. the chinese get more soy beans and they get higher wage, we get lower prices. everybody wins. >> if we insisted that everything be made in america, we would be poor? >> absolutely. >> a couple of other methods. over population, i was told that's why asia's poor and africa's poor. it's a big problem. >> yeah, the problem is not that there are too many people. the problem is that they don't have free markets itch they have bad governments that take their resources. one thing that opened my brain about it was to look at some of the population data. i heard that nigeria's poor because of over population, pakistan's poor because of over population. and look, nigeria, pakistan, they have 174 people p
. >> well, president obama is also talking this morning and he celebrated independence day with 24 u.s. service members as they became u.s. citizens. well, the president also using that ceremony to once again call for what he says is the need for immigration reform. listen to this. >> we remain a nation of laws and we have to remain a nation of immigrants. that's why as another step forward, we're lifting the shadow of deportation from serving -- from deserving young people who were brought to this country as children. that's why we still need a dream act to keep talented young people who want to contribute to our society and serve our country. it's why we need -- why america's success demands comprehensive immigration reform. >> and with the fourth of july holiday now over, it will be a quick return to the presidential campaign in just a few hours, president obama hitting the road as two of mitt romney's biggest supporters will be campaigning for him in the same exact areas that the president is targeting. molly henneberg is live for us in washington now with some more details. good
was dismissed as just another hunting rival. >> the left always uses assault rifles. they are really used in hunting. >> eliot: funny, i never tried to see a hunter try to bag a deal with one of those. he even defended the availability of the extra capacity magazine seen used in the attack. >> there are magazines common all over the place. you simply hi cannot keep these weapons out of the hands of sick demented individuals who want to do harm. when you try to do t you restrict our freedoms. >> eliot: we can set a speed limit but we can't ban the 100 round magazine used by james holmes. murdoch tweeted, supplied, i quote, we have to do something about gun controls, police license okay for hunting rifle or pistol for anyone without crim or psycho record no more. my pleasure to welcome to this program, the author of the domestic gunman, senator, thank you for joining us. >> thank you. you have been a proponent for gun control even in the aftermath of colorado, backing the recent measures you've had for so many years. why are we where we are. >> because of a very successful lobby controlled
in demonstrations when they were shot. >> we were in a protest. the army shot at us with automatic weapons. the bullet hit me in the leg and broke a bone. >> there is growing international concern about syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. israel has said it would act if they felt there were falling into the wrong hands. today, the syrian foreign ministry said the weapons were safe but warned they could be used in the event of foreign intervention. >> any unconventional weapon would never be used against civilians or syrian people in this crisis. these weapons are meant to be used only in the evidence of external aggression against the syrian republic. >> several governments are putting in place contingency plans to evacuate their nationals. the fighting inside syria it shows no signs of abating. bbc news on the turkey-syria border. >> the subject of the chemical weapons, president obama had this message today for the syrian government. >> given the stockpiles of chemical weapons, we will continue to make it clear the world is watching and that they will be held accountable by the intern
syrian government forces have their guns trained on oppositions in the commercial capital. u.s. state department officials are among those who believe the soldiers are preparing to attack aleppo. ban ki-moon used the site of a massacre in boss nia to call for an end to the civil war. jun takahashi reports. >> reporter: ban key man wrapped up his tour of the former yugoslavia by visiting a city that saw the worst of the war there. he visited srebrenitzah to remember the past but also to warn of what's happening else where right now. >> international community failed to to provide the necessary protection for many people who were killed at the time when they needed our support. >> reporter: troops were stationed in the area as u.n. peacekeepers, but they were outgunned and outmanned. boss knowian serb troops overran srebrenitzah in july, 1995. they separated man and boys from women and girls. then they slaughtered 8,000 of them on a remote mountainside. 17 years on, people in srebrenitzah are reminded of the massacre almost daily. scientists are still trying to find the remains o
. anyone can sell guns to those who regularly use the arms to kill their own people. >> how many guns had he got on you? >> 43. >> how many bananas? only to that, because that is regulated. >> justin brand. we'll speak with amnesty usa executive director suzanne nossel. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. at least 25 people have been killed and more than 50 wounded in a car bombing in the iraqi city of diwaania. crowdedack targeted a crowd o market. with sectarian attacks on the rise, at least 237 people were killed in iraq last month, making june 1 of the bloodiest since u.s. forces withdrew late last year. syrian president bashar al-assad has expressed regret for the downing of a turkish air jet that stoked tensions with neighboring turkey last month. speaking to a turkish newspaper, al-assad said he will not allow the incident to escalate into combat between the two countries. in other syria news, dozens of members of syria's opposition met in cairo on monday to formulate a new transition from al-assad's
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